All Half Mad Here

discoverynews:

Shroud of Turin: Could Quake Explain Face of Jesus?
The authenticity of the Shroud of Turin has been in question for centuries and scientific investigations over the last few decades have only seemed to muddle the debate. Is the revered cloth a miracle or an elaborate hoax?
Now, a study claims neutron emissions from an ancient earthquake that rocked Jerusalem could have created the iconic image, as well as messed up the radiocarbon levels that later suggested the shroud was a medieval forgery. But other scientists say this newly proposed premise leaves some major questions unanswered.
Read more

discoverynews:

Shroud of Turin: Could Quake Explain Face of Jesus?

The authenticity of the Shroud of Turin has been in question for centuries and scientific investigations over the last few decades have only seemed to muddle the debate. Is the revered cloth a miracle or an elaborate hoax?

Now, a study claims neutron emissions from an ancient earthquake that rocked Jerusalem could have created the iconic image, as well as messed up the radiocarbon levels that later suggested the shroud was a medieval forgery. But other scientists say this newly proposed premise leaves some major questions unanswered.

Read more

posted 7 mesi fa via discoverynews with 299 note

latimes:

California’s calamitous drought drags on

It’s dry in California - historically dry. Water is in short supply, the air is noticeably without moisture, farms are parched and just look at the photo above of the state’s dwindling snow cover. It pretty much speaks for itself.

Meanwhile, various interests are turning to the political realm to try and ensure they get theirs when it comes to H2O.

And the drought has been particularly harsh on agriculture:

Ranchers have begun liquidating herds. Growers are considering tearing out thirsty tree crops such as nut orchards and citrus groves. And tens of thousands of additional acres of prime California soil could go unplanted if farmers don’t get enough water to irrigate them.

Read more on the drought’s effect on California here.

Photos: David McNew / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / Associated Press, NOAA, Randall Benton / Los Angeles Times

posted 7 mesi fa via npr · © Los Angeles Times with 3.413 note

npr:

Income inequality will get a full airing in President Obama’s fifth State of the Union speech.

posted 7 mesi fa via npr with 89 note


assassinbutts:

wenchymcwench:

We enter a little coffeehouse with a friend of mine and give our order. While we’re aproaching our table two people come in and they go to the counter: ‘Five coffees, please. Two of them for us and three suspended’ They pay for their order, take the two and leave.  I ask my friend: “What are those ‘suspended’ coffees?” My friend: “Wait for it and you will see.” Some more people enter. Two girls ask for one coffee each, pay and go. The next order was for seven coffees and it was made by three lawyers - three for them and four ‘suspended’. While I still wonder what’s the deal with those ‘suspended’ coffees I enjoy the sunny weather and the beautiful view towards the square infront of the café. Suddenly a man dressed in shabby clothes who looks like a beggar comes in throught the door and kindly asks ‘Do you have a suspended coffee ?’ It’s simple - people pay in advance for a coffee meant for someone who can not afford a warm bevarage. The tradition with the suspended coffees started in Naples, but it has spread all over the world and in some places you can order not only a suspended coffee, but also a sandwitch or a whole meal. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to have such cafés or even grocery stores in every town where the less fortunate will find hope and support ? If you own a business why don’t you offer it to your clients… I am sure many of them will like it.
 
Source : [x]

assassinbutts:

wenchymcwench:

We enter a little coffeehouse with a friend of mine and give our order. While we’re aproaching our table two people come in and they go to the counter:
‘Five coffees, please. Two of them for us and three suspended’ They pay for their order, take the two and leave.

I ask my friend: “What are those ‘suspended’ coffees?”
My friend: “Wait for it and you will see.”

Some more people enter. Two girls ask for one coffee each, pay and go. The next order was for seven coffees and it was made by three lawyers - three for them and four ‘suspended’. While I still wonder what’s the deal with those ‘suspended’ coffees I enjoy the sunny weather and the beautiful view towards the square infront of the café. Suddenly a man dressed in shabby clothes who looks like a beggar comes in throught the door and kindly asks
‘Do you have a suspended coffee ?’

It’s simple - people pay in advance for a coffee meant for someone who can not afford a warm bevarage. The tradition with the suspended coffees started in Naples, but it has spread all over the world and in some places you can order not only a suspended coffee, but also a sandwitch or a whole meal.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful to have such cafés or even grocery stores in every town where the less fortunate will find hope and support ? If you own a business why don’t you offer it to your clients… I am sure many of them will like it.

 

Source : [x]


life:

In late 1971, two years after the Stonewall riots in New York sparked the modern gay rights movement in America, and twelve months before LIFE ceased publishing as a weekly, the magazine featured an article on “gay liberation” that, seen a full 40 years later, feels sensational, measured and somehow endearingly, deeply square all at the same time.
See the essay here on LIFE.com.
(Grey Villet—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

life:

In late 1971, two years after the Stonewall riots in New York sparked the modern gay rights movement in America, and twelve months before LIFE ceased publishing as a weekly, the magazine featured an article on “gay liberation” that, seen a full 40 years later, feels sensational, measured and somehow endearingly, deeply square all at the same time.

See the essay here on LIFE.com.

(Grey Villet—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

posted 1 anno fa via life with 1.444 note

newyorker:

Patrick Radden Keefe on the slippery questions raised by “In Cold Blood” and the obsessive interest in its making: “For years, Alvin Dewey insisted that ‘In Cold Blood’ was factual, and the humble lawman’s stamp of approval was evinced, by those who were inclined to believe the book, as a badge of its accuracy. He had furnished Capote with the access and materials to tell the true parts of his story, and had permitted the author to stretch the truth, in making, of Dewey, a hero. He was, in this subtle sense, a co-conspirator.” Continue reading: http://nyr.kr/Xv4xH9
Photograph by Bruce Davidson/Magnum.

newyorker:

Patrick Radden Keefe on the slippery questions raised by “In Cold Blood” and the obsessive interest in its making: “For years, Alvin Dewey insisted that ‘In Cold Blood’ was factual, and the humble lawman’s stamp of approval was evinced, by those who were inclined to believe the book, as a badge of its accuracy. He had furnished Capote with the access and materials to tell the true parts of his story, and had permitted the author to stretch the truth, in making, of Dewey, a hero. He was, in this subtle sense, a co-conspirator.” Continue reading: http://nyr.kr/Xv4xH9

Photograph by Bruce Davidson/Magnum.

posted 1 anno fa via newyorker with 145 note


She inspired a novel and a movie starring Robert Redford when in 1949 she lured a major league ballplayer she’d never met into a hotel room with a cryptic note and shot him, nearly killing him.
After the headlines faded, Ruth Ann Steinhagen did something else just as surprising: She disappeared into obscurity, living a quiet life unnoticed in Chicago until now, more than a half century later, when news broke that she had died three months earlier.
The story, with its elements of obsession, mystery, insanity and a baseball star, made it part of both Chicago’s colourful crime history and rich baseball lore. (Photo: AP/Files)

She inspired a novel and a movie starring Robert Redford when in 1949 she lured a major league ballplayer she’d never met into a hotel room with a cryptic note and shot him, nearly killing him.

After the headlines faded, Ruth Ann Steinhagen did something else just as surprising: She disappeared into obscurity, living a quiet life unnoticed in Chicago until now, more than a half century later, when news broke that she had died three months earlier.

The story, with its elements of obsession, mystery, insanity and a baseball star, made it part of both Chicago’s colourful crime history and rich baseball lore. (Photo: AP/Files)


latimes:

Conclave ceremony begins at the Vatican

The process to select a new pope officially began this morning, as 115 Roman Catholic cardinals celebrated Mass at St. Peter’s Basilica, and upon finishing the service, strode into the Sistine Chapel to begin deliberations.

The decision could take a day, a week or even longer - there’s no deadline to picking the next pope. But once a candidate gains the support of two-thirds of the vote, white smoke will be seen above the chapel, signalling that Pope Emeritus Benedict’s successor has been chosen.

Take a closer look at the papal pageantry via Framework, and read more on the selection process here.

Photos: Franco Origlia / Getty Images, Osservatore Romano / AFP/Getty Images, Gregorio Borgia / Associated Press

posted 1 anno fa via latimes with 146 note

life:

As the Catholic Church prepares to elect a new pope after Benedict XVI’s surprise resignation, LIFE.com recalls another turning point for the church a half-century ago: the historic Vatican II council that began in Rome in 1962. See the photos here.
Pictured: Pope John XXIII rides in procession to St. Peter’s Basilica at the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council, 1962
(Paul Schutzer—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

life:

As the Catholic Church prepares to elect a new pope after Benedict XVI’s surprise resignation, LIFE.com recalls another turning point for the church a half-century ago: the historic Vatican II council that began in Rome in 1962. See the photos here.

Pictured: Pope John XXIII rides in procession to St. Peter’s Basilica at the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council, 1962

(Paul Schutzer—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

posted 1 anno fa via life with 225 note

allcreatures:


Two dogs are seen guarding a bicycle in Nanjing, capital of southern China’s Guangxi Province. According to owner Luo Ganren, the pair are protective of him and his possessions. My bike has no lock, and I never worry it would be stolen, thanks to my two puppies. They will guard the bike by holding the bars until they see me back.

Picture: HAP/Quirky China News / Rex Features (via Pictures of the day: 26 February 2013 - Telegraph)

allcreatures:

Two dogs are seen guarding a bicycle in Nanjing, capital of southern China’s Guangxi Province. According to owner Luo Ganren, the pair are protective of him and his possessions. My bike has no lock, and I never worry it would be stolen, thanks to my two puppies. They will guard the bike by holding the bars until they see me back.

Picture: HAP/Quirky China News / Rex Features (via Pictures of the day: 26 February 2013 - Telegraph)


nationalpost:

Lost continent found off coast of Madagascar lost to the ocean depths 85 million years agoIt isn’t quite Atlantis, but scientists from Norway, Germany and Britain have found what they say is a lost continent that they’ve named Mauritia at the bottom of the Indian Ocean.The strip of continent once connected Madagascar, the island archipelago of Seychelles and India. As tectonic movement shifted the land masses apart, the connective tissue of Mauritia was pushed to the bottom of the Ocean, where it was shredded and partially consumed by underwater volcanos. (ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

nationalpost:

Lost continent found off coast of Madagascar lost to the ocean depths 85 million years ago
It isn’t quite Atlantis, but scientists from Norway, Germany and Britain have found what they say is a lost continent that they’ve named Mauritia at the bottom of the Indian Ocean.

The strip of continent once connected Madagascar, the island archipelago of Seychelles and India. As tectonic movement shifted the land masses apart, the connective tissue of Mauritia was pushed to the bottom of the Ocean, where it was shredded and partially consumed by underwater volcanos. (ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

posted 1 anno fa via nationalpost with 118 note


latimes:

LAPD manhunt underway: Local, state and federal authorities are in the midst of a search for ex-Los Angeles police officer Christoper Jordan Dorner, who’s under wanted for his alleged connection to a double homicide and the shootings of three police officers.

Dorner, 33, threatened “unconventional and asymmetrical warfare” against police in an manifesto posted on his Facebook page. He also threatened more than two dozen people — including police officials — in his post.

Los Angeles and Torrance police have also been confirmed to have shot two individuals and fired upon another driving vehicles similar to the one Dorner is suspected to be using.

Read more on the search, and follow the latest updates on LA Now.

(Photo via Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times, Nick Ut / Associated Press)

posted 1 anno fa via latimes with 218 note