All Half Mad Here

sinuses:

In 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to run the Boston marathon. After realizing that a woman was running, race organizer Jock Semple went after Switzer shouting, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” However, Switzer’s boyfriend and other male runners provided a protective shield during the entire marathon. The photographs taken of the incident made world headlines, and Kathrine later won the NYC marathon with a time of 3:07:29.

sinuses:

In 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to run the Boston marathon. After realizing that a woman was running, race organizer Jock Semple went after Switzer shouting, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” However, Switzer’s boyfriend and other male runners provided a protective shield during the entire marathon. The photographs taken of the incident made world headlines, and Kathrine later won the NYC marathon with a time of 3:07:29.


latimes:

Above is a testament to Los Angeles’ Pacific Electric Red Cars, taken out of service in 1961. The cars once crisscrossed four counties on more than 1,000 miles of track, but now only exist in memories and photographs.

Photos: Art Rogers, Grant MacDonald, Ray Graham, R.L. Oliver / Los Angeles Times

posted 1 anno fa via latimes with 342 note

ucresearch:

UC Irvine’s first female faculty member, Marjorie Caserio in her chemistry lab, 1965.

ucresearch:

UC Irvine’s first female faculty member, Marjorie Caserio in her chemistry lab, 1965.

posted 1 anno fa via ucresearch with 259 note

latimes:

Mississippi ratifies the 13th Amendment: This isn’t 148 years late - it took an investigation spurred by the film “Lincoln,” for Mississippi residents to realize that they hadn’t, in the eyes of archivists, formally banned slavery.
The state initially refused to ratify the amendment back in 1865, and it took until 1995 for the state legislature to finally jump on board with the rest of the country. But no one had notified the U.S. archivist, and without that step, the ratification was never fully official.
For more on the strange series of events, head over to Nation Now.
Photo: David James / DreamWorks

latimes:

Mississippi ratifies the 13th Amendment: This isn’t 148 years late - it took an investigation spurred by the film “Lincoln,” for Mississippi residents to realize that they hadn’t, in the eyes of archivists, formally banned slavery.

The state initially refused to ratify the amendment back in 1865, and it took until 1995 for the state legislature to finally jump on board with the rest of the country. But no one had notified the U.S. archivist, and without that step, the ratification was never fully official.

For more on the strange series of events, head over to Nation Now.

Photo: David James / DreamWorks

posted 1 anno fa via latimes with 192 note

discoverynews:

Prohibition Repeal Echoes in Marijuana Legalization
With voter approval of two ballot initiatives in Colorado and Washington for the legalization of marijuana, the two states have taken the unprecedented step of directly challenging the drug’s over 40-year federal ban. The success of the measures have drawn national attention, and represents a major victory for the marijuana legalization movement.

discoverynews:

Prohibition Repeal Echoes in Marijuana Legalization

With voter approval of two ballot initiatives in Colorado and Washington for the legalization of marijuana, the two states have taken the unprecedented step of directly challenging the drug’s over 40-year federal ban. The success of the measures have drawn national attention, and represents a major victory for the marijuana legalization movement.
posted 1 anno fa via discoverynews with 233 note

drownmysorrowsintea:

babywarrior5:

mccunt:

stangefruitandwildthing:

Geraldine Hoff Doyle, was a 17 years (in 1942) while she was working at the American Broach & Machine Co. when a photographer snapped a pic of her on the job.
That image used by J. Howard Miller for the “We Can Do It!” poster, released during World War II. 

Oh shit, that’s the real “Rosie the Riveter” ?
BAMF

BAMF INDEED. This woman deserves all the respect in the universe!

<3<3<3<3<3<3<3

drownmysorrowsintea:

babywarrior5:

mccunt:

stangefruitandwildthing:

Geraldine Hoff Doyle, was a 17 years (in 1942) while she was working at the American Broach & Machine Co. when a photographer snapped a pic of her on the job.

That image used by J. Howard Miller for the “We Can Do It!” poster, released during World War II. 

Oh shit, that’s the real “Rosie the Riveter” ?

BAMF

BAMF INDEED. This woman deserves all the respect in the universe!

<3<3<3<3<3<3<3


npr:

The story of The Highwaymen is one of biracial friendships, lingering racism, painting and a murder — culminating in a contemporary clash over an artistic legacy.
via The Murder Of A Protege: The Story Of Alfred Hair by Jacki Lyden
Photo: Courtesy of Doretha Hair Truesdell
~~~~
This story is fascinating. — Tanya B.

npr:

The story of The Highwaymen is one of biracial friendships, lingering racism, painting and a murder — culminating in a contemporary clash over an artistic legacy.

via The Murder Of A Protege: The Story Of Alfred Hair by Jacki Lyden

Photo: Courtesy of Doretha Hair Truesdell

~~~~

This story is fascinating. — Tanya B.

posted 1 anno fa via npr with 219 note

discoverynews:

Particle ‘Consistent’ With Higgs Boson Discovered
The Higgs boson mediates the “Higgs field” that ultimately endows all matter with mass — finding the Higgs is therefore imperative for physicists to understand what gives the Universe substance. In other words, this discovery could lead to a whole new understanding of how the universe began.
When reports first surfaced that Peter Higgs — one of the six physicists who, in the 1960s, developed the theory behind Higgs boson — had been invited to CERN for this morning’s announcement, the event became hard to ignore: something historic was about to happen.
keep reading
A helpful piece on how stuff works on “What exactly is the Higgs boson?”

discoverynews:

Particle ‘Consistent’ With Higgs Boson Discovered

The Higgs boson mediates the “Higgs field” that ultimately endows all matter with mass — finding the Higgs is therefore imperative for physicists to understand what gives the Universe substance. In other words, this discovery could lead to a whole new understanding of how the universe began.

When reports first surfaced that Peter Higgs — one of the six physicists who, in the 1960s, developed the theory behind Higgs boson — had been invited to CERN for this morning’s announcement, the event became hard to ignore: something historic was about to happen.

keep reading

A helpful piece on how stuff works on “What exactly is the Higgs boson?”

posted 1 anno fa via discoverynews with 961 note


Working a rough storyboard draft for a photography/book project.

I never met my Tio Carlos. The first time I saw him was in a photo album. All the photos were faded, taken during a time when Kodak actually existed. Outrageous outfits and even more ridiculous hair. That album still has a musky photographic smell to it. 

He was holding my cousin Lili when she was a baby. I imagine the photo was taken in 1979/1980 (I’m horrible for not remembering my cousin’s birth year). What I remember from that photo were his eyes. 

They were pensive. Eyes that seemed to carry a weight, a worry. Protective eyes… I don’t think I understood what those eyes expressed until now. My uncle was a doctor. He was a son. He was a brother. He was care giver. He was a protector. He’s my hero.

That photo was probably taken a year or so before he disappeared. He was thirty-one.

Thirty-one years later and I am just discovering who my Tio Carlos was. 

posted 1 anno fa via millumino with 3 note

life:

On the afternoon of April 30, 2012, steelworkers placed the first column on the 100th floor at One World Trade Center (still called, by some, the “Freedom Tower”) and New York City will again have a new tallest building on its skyline. But no matter how much higher One World Trade climbs, however, and whatever skyscrapers follow in the years and decades to come, there will always be one building in New York City that looms larger, and is looked on more fondly, than any other.
The Empire State Building opened for business on May 1, 1931, in the midst of the Great Depression, with New York governor Al Smith’s grandchildren cutting the ceremonial ribbon that introduced the 102-story masterpiece to the world. For four decades, it was the tallest building on the planet, before it was finally surpassed in 1972 by the World Trade Center towers anchoring lower Manhattan three miles south. Today, long after it lost the title as the tallest building in the world, and at a time when taller structures (everywhere, but especially in Asia) are rising at a dizzying clip, the ESB nevertheless still stands alone — literally and figuratively — on the Manhattan skyline.
Read more about the history of the Empire State Building here.

life:

On the afternoon of April 30, 2012, steelworkers placed the first column on the 100th floor at One World Trade Center (still called, by some, the “Freedom Tower”) and New York City will again have a new tallest building on its skyline. But no matter how much higher One World Trade climbs, however, and whatever skyscrapers follow in the years and decades to come, there will always be one building in New York City that looms larger, and is looked on more fondly, than any other.

The Empire State Building opened for business on May 1, 1931, in the midst of the Great Depression, with New York governor Al Smith’s grandchildren cutting the ceremonial ribbon that introduced the 102-story masterpiece to the world. For four decades, it was the tallest building on the planet, before it was finally surpassed in 1972 by the World Trade Center towers anchoring lower Manhattan three miles south. Today, long after it lost the title as the tallest building in the world, and at a time when taller structures (everywhere, but especially in Asia) are rising at a dizzying clip, the ESB nevertheless still stands alone — literally and figuratively — on the Manhattan skyline.

Read more about the history of the Empire State Building here.

posted 1 anno fa via life with 839 note

life:

Of the indispensable photographs taken during the Second World War, Margaret Bourke-White’s image of survivors at Buchenwald in April 1945 — “staring out at their Allied rescuers,” as LIFE magazine put it, “like so many living corpses” — remains among the most haunting. The faces of the men, young and old, staring from behind the wire, “barely able to believe that they would be delivered from a Nazi camp where the only deliverance had been death,” attest with an awful eloquence to the depths of human depravity and, maybe even more powerfully, to the measureless lineaments of human endurance.
On the anniversary of the liberation of Buchenwald by Patton’s Third Army, LIFE.com looks at the story — and at other, harrowing photographs — behind one of the indispensable images from World War II. 
Read more here.
(Margaret Bourke-White—Time &amp; Life Pictures/Getty Images)

life:

Of the indispensable photographs taken during the Second World War, Margaret Bourke-White’s image of survivors at Buchenwald in April 1945“staring out at their Allied rescuers,” as LIFE magazine put it, “like so many living corpses” — remains among the most haunting. The faces of the men, young and old, staring from behind the wire, “barely able to believe that they would be delivered from a Nazi camp where the only deliverance had been death,” attest with an awful eloquence to the depths of human depravity and, maybe even more powerfully, to the measureless lineaments of human endurance.

On the anniversary of the liberation of Buchenwald by Patton’s Third Army, LIFE.com looks at the story — and at other, harrowing photographs — behind one of the indispensable images from World War II. 

Read more here.

(Margaret Bourke-White—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

posted 2 anni fa via life with 1.593 note

nprfreshair:

“To keep their children from going to the fields, some parents in the 17th century would allow their daughter to sleep in the same bed as the young man courting her – but both the woman and man were tied down with heavy rope, in a practice known as ‘bundling.’” — From today’s Fresh Air, on the history of bedrooms, bathrooms and kitchens.
[Photo via weheartit]

nprfreshair:

“To keep their children from going to the fields, some parents in the 17th century would allow their daughter to sleep in the same bed as the young man courting her – but both the woman and man were tied down with heavy rope, in a practice known as ‘bundling.’” — From today’s Fresh Air, on the history of bedrooms, bathrooms and kitchens.

[Photo via weheartit]

posted 2 anni fa via npr · © NPR with 1.320 note

life:

Fifty-odd years ago, a young singer/dancer on the verge of breaking into the movies visited LIFE magazine’s L.A. bureau — and for once, the newshounds who worked there were speechless.

“Everybody was working on typewriters back then, so it was very noisy, I’m sitting in my office and suddenly it got quiet. All the typewriters stopped. I thought, ‘What the hell is going on?’ So I got up and I walked to the door. And what was happening? Ann-Margret was walking through the newsroom.”
-Richard B. Stolley, who at the time was bureau chief. 

Ann-Margret became one of Hollywood’s sexiest, most vivacious stars, lighting up such movies as Bye Bye Birdie, Viva Las Vegas and Tommy. Through the years, the journalist, now 82, and the actress, now 70, have remained dear friends. The two recently reminisced over photos by Grey Villet (“Oh, I loved him,” she says of the late LIFE photographer) from the 1961 LIFE feature that introduced Ann-Margret as a hot Hollywood prospect, while she auditioned for a role in the film, State Fair.
Many of the photos in this gallery, meanwhile, have never before been published.

life:

Fifty-odd years ago, a young singer/dancer on the verge of breaking into the movies visited LIFE magazine’s L.A. bureau — and for once, the newshounds who worked there were speechless.

“Everybody was working on typewriters back then, so it was very noisy, I’m sitting in my office and suddenly it got quiet. All the typewriters stopped. I thought, ‘What the hell is going on?’ So I got up and I walked to the door. And what was happening? Ann-Margret was walking through the newsroom.”

-Richard B. Stolley, who at the time was bureau chief. 

Ann-Margret became one of Hollywood’s sexiest, most vivacious stars, lighting up such movies as Bye Bye Birdie, Viva Las Vegas and Tommy. Through the years, the journalist, now 82, and the actress, now 70, have remained dear friends. The two recently reminisced over photos by Grey Villet (“Oh, I loved him,” she says of the late LIFE photographer) from the 1961 LIFE feature that introduced Ann-Margret as a hot Hollywood prospect, while she auditioned for a role in the film, State Fair.

Many of the photos in this gallery, meanwhile, have never before been published.

posted 2 anni fa via life with 284 note